Ricardo Gomes

Associate

Ricardo Gomes

Associate

Share this

Dittmar & Indrenius > People > Ricardo Gomes

Focus on international arbitration and data protection related matters.

Ricardo Gomes advises international and domestic clients on issues relating to dispute resolution, arbitration and alternative dispute resolution methods. Ricardo specialises in international arbitration under different institutional rules. In addition, he advises clients on data protection issues, namely data processing activities and retention issues.

Prior to joining Dittmar & Indrenius Ricardo gained experience as a trainee in the international arbitration group at LALIVE in Geneva.

Education

University of Helsinki (LL.M., 2015)

University of Lisbon (LL.B., 2011)

Languages

English, Portuguese and Spanish

References

Latest Insights

insight
DR Meets Tech
22 Jun 2017 Change is inevitable. Society undergoes alterations every day and one cannot look at the world as it is today but the world as it will be. We are surrounded by technology in our daily life. This also applies to lawyers - will they be replaced by robots and would that actually be a bad thing? The above mentioned is one of the questions that was dealt with in D&I's Evening Classes (in Finnish Iltakoulu) where we had the honour to hear the visions of Riikka Koulu, a research fellow specialised in legal technology, legal automation and dispute resolution at the University of Helsinki. D&I has a special partnership with the Legal Tech Lab, an exciting project of the Faculty of Law, University of Helsinki, which has a mission to bring something new to the legal field: a new way of looking at legal services, new tools to facilitate participation and a forward-looking mindset.               Lawyers and the judicial system are often appearing to value stability and even seen to be unwilling to adapt to society's changes. Even today, the law sector in general is seen as conservative and traditional. However, it is undeniable that technology will change the role of lawyers. The question is how the lawyers can prepare themselves for the changes in order to be ready to engage the opportunities that technology offers. Gaining current information on legal technology is the starting point. At the moment, we at D&I are using an intelligent software for litigators and arbitration practitioners which makes writing large submissions with numerous exhibits easy. It allows us to create an ebrief, an interactive submission to courts and/or arbitral tribunals in pdf format with hyperlinks to the relevant exhibits. You can access the exhibits by clicking the hyperlinks in the footnotes. This process will open a new pdf window where the exhibit is displayed for your review. This is a spectacular example on how legal technology can serve lawyers and dispute resolution by making the writing and reading of submissions more efficient and pleasant. In addition, it involves the client in the production process. The client will be able to follow the lawyers' argumentation and be able to give input on the submissions before they are filed. For example, there is a tendency in international arbitration to depart from what can rightfully be called the "paper tsunami" to its digital equivalent: the e-arbitration. New terms have been coined for almost all steps of the arbitration proceedings: eBriefs, eDiscovery, eHearings, eArbitrators and eBundles. We believe that there is still a long way in litigation in Finland but some countries have a complete digital platform for court cases. Filings happen electronically, checking status of judgements can be done electronically, booking hearing dates can be done electronically etc. When everything shifts towards the digital sphere the intervention of AI becomes more relevant and prominent.     "Algorithms will become the new normal. AI taking care of the previously time-consuming routines, it is up to us lawyers to figure out how we will complete the big picture with the maximum value to our clients. Personally, I have always valued human interaction, listening and empathy, as key features in dispute resolution. To be honest, I welcome the robots automating everything else", says Partner Jussi Lehtinen. Key Insights Digitalization changes dispute resolution. Lawyers must be ready for changes and be able to understand their effect in practical dispute resolution. Project management is essential. In the future, lawyers must recognise when the human labour is needed. Utilise this opportunity to allocate human labour more efficiently. The price of anonymity and noninteraction can be high in dispute resolution. Prepare for disruption. Investing on the struggles of digitalization helps you to cope with the inevitable changes. Observe the downside of efficiency in dispute resolution –ensure that you do not prioritise efficiency at the expense of legal security.
insight
The Finnish National Implementation of the GDPR On Its Way
22 Jun 2017 From Regulating Personal Data Files to Enhancing Data Protection The clock is ticking - there is less than a year until the GDPR (the "General Data Protection Regulation") comes into effect. The European data protection authorities are doing their best to give guidance on how to interpret the regulation. However, even though the purpose of the GDPR is to harmonize the European data protection legislation, some issues are left open to the member states. On 1st of June, D&I hosted an insightful morning seminar with a tasty breakfast and engaging discussions. We had the honor to have Mr Pekka Nurmi, chairperson of the Finnish Data Protection Board and of the Working Group responsible for assessing the implementation in the first phase, as a keynote speaker. At the event, the participants got a glimpse on how the Finnish data protection regime is going to look like in 2018. As Mr Nurmi pointed out, the Finnish regulators aim to ensure that the Finnish national laws give companies established in Finland a competitive edge as far as possible. In general, many of D&I's clients see the data protection regime not only as a challenge but also as an opportunity. Certainly, we at D&I think that the regulatory regime is an opportunity for companies to embrace the new age of digitalization, and we strive to give our clients the best tools to get the most of the data protection laws. At D&I we see data protection, as well as all the other legal issues, as an intertwined area composed of various legal questions that relate to several fields of law. Therefore, we engage the full spectrum of our expertise in every assignment. The details of the national implementation will be out before midsummer, but we can already point out three interesting and relevant aspects that should be noted from the proposal. 1Filling the Gaps First and foremost, it is highly likely that by 2018 there's going to be a new Finnish general data protection law ("tietosuojalaki"). The Finnish general data protection law will be based on the GDPR text and will only cover specific sector that are not regulated by the GDPR. The GDPR leaves some areas open to be decided upon by the Member States. For example, the processing of personal data relating to criminal convictions and offences by private entities is lawful only when authorized by the European Union or the Member State laws. All such provisions will, to the extent possible, be found from the general data protection law. However, some practices need to be regulated in sectoral laws. For example the processing of information related to customer misconducts by credit companies has been considered lawful when based on the prior authorization of the Finnish Data Protection Board. Such authorization procedure will in all likelihood be in place also under the GDPR, but regulated in separate sectoral laws. The Working Group is at this point assessing only the necessary laws and regulations, and all the sectoral laws will be reviewed by the competent ministries in the second phase of implementation. 2The Empowered Authority The Finnish supervisory authority will be the data protection ombudsman. As Mr Nurmi pointed out, the data protection ombudsman's office is understaffed, as the workload is going to increase rapidly and extensively. Indeed, we forecast that there is a need for an increase in the resources of the Finnish data protection ombudsman - our partner, and head of Data Protection, Marketing & Consumers team, Jukka Lång pointed out that the resources in 2017 are almost similar to what they were in early 2000's when he worked at the data protection ombudsman's office as an inspector. Time will show how prepared and well funded the new authority will be, but we find that it is in the interest of every company that the Supervisory Authority is capable of giving guidance to the companies facing increasing data protection issues in their everyday business. 3Disputes - What If? And What Then? As the sanctions under the GDPR are much higher than any possible sanctions under the data protection laws currently in force in Finland, the likelihood of data processing related disputes, and the risk related to these, is much greater. The Working Group proposes that a "Sanctions Board" is created in addition to the data protection authority. The Board will probably consist of 5 lawyer members and it will be responsible for deciding the GDPR based sanctions based on data protection ombudsman proposal. As the sanctions under the GDPR are fairly high and harmonized within the EU, we will surely see long trials all the way to the European Court of Justice. Additionally, as our Partner and Head of Dispute Resolution Jussi Lehtinen pointed out, we will probably see many long and complicated disputes that include administrative procedures on related to the sanctions as well as parallel or follow on civil procedures for the damages. (Read More on D&I Dispute Resolution and Data Protection Alert published on 1 June 2017 in Finnish).  

Share this

Dittmar & Indrenius