Katja Hollmén

Director of Client Relations

Katja Hollmén

Director of Client Relations

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Dittmar & Indrenius > People > Katja Hollmén

Focus on client experience

Katja Hollmén is responsible for D&I’s brand and sales strategy, content marketing, CX, CRM, CEM, and strategic business development projects related thereto.

She works closely with HR and IT departments to make that sure that cultural and brand-related matters are blended together with technology choices, internal operative processes and service design.

Her background from top-tier law firms and from various leaderships positions in both banking and media sectors give her a unique perspective on business development and change management of a professional services firm.

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Education

University of Helsinki (Master of Laws 2000)

NYU School of Law (LL.M 2002)

Member of the New York State Bar (2003)

Languages

Finnish, English, Swedish, French

Latest Insights

insight
Earth Needs Good Lawyers
18 Jun 2018 As of January 2018, our much respected ex-Partner Raija-Leena Ojanen has been working as the legal advisor for WWF. At D&I, Raija was a true role model for her uncompromising dedication to the highest level of professional service. Q: What made you first want to work for WWF? The idea of working for an environmental organization slowly grew upon me. Through the pro bono work done at D&I for WWF, I started to receive regular dosages of information about the deterioration of the biodiversity, the overexploitation of natural resources and the increasing urgency to tackle climate change. The flow of information increased when I was appointed board member for WWF Finland.  Also, during those years, I had many interesting discussions with my daughter, who recently completed her masters in biology, about human genetics, biochemistry and how exposure to toxic chemicals affects us. Thirdly, client projects involving sustainability and compliance became more and more important parts of my work as head of Corporate advisory, Compliance and CSR. I remember starting to vaguely think about a future in globally oriented environmental work sometime around 2014/2015. The thoughts grew stronger last summer at Berkeley where I completed the first part of my two-summer LLM studies. At Berkeley I learned how big a role lawyers play, at least in America, in promoting environmentally conscious and sustainable public policies. I was greatly impressed by the organization Earthjustice that uses the slogan “Earth Needs a Good Lawyer”. Q: What are the most rewarding things about working at WWF? WWF works to build a future where there is good balance between nature and people. The work is done on a wide spectrum of activities ranging from building snowbanks to protect the newborn Saimaa ringed seal to hands-on building of fishways around dams in freshwater waterways to interaction with politicians and businesses about steps towards carbon-neutrality and further onto international talks at Arctic Council. Although I thought that I had a pretty good understanding ahead, I have been amazed during the first months as a new Panda (that’s what new recruits are called at WWF) at how much the group of about 60 people at WWF Finland can accomplish. The talent is in cooperation and the engaging organizations and people to work with WWF to reach important goals. It is very rewarding to be able to contribute my part for the saving of the world. Q: What legal issues or challenges have you got coming up on the horizon at WWF? The great challenge at WWF is making governments and businesses understand the urgency around climate change. Although the common goal under the Paris Agreement is to keep the global warming under 2°C compared to pre-industrial time, the transformation to carbon-neutrality is lagging seriously behind. It is apparent that the present policy approach that promotes voluntary efforts and produces legislation that impose transparency and reporting requirements to generate market pressure on reducing carbon footprints have proven to be insufficient. Making the changes happen soon enough seems to call for impact-oriented legislation. The parliaments in Finland, in EU and globally may need to move to passing binding obligation on government entities and businesses to assess whether their actions are in line with the two-degree target and if not, to make the necessary changes. The challenge is how to draft such legislation so that the rules are easy to understand, implement and monitor. Q: What do you miss from Dittmar & Indrenius? The best part of the work at D&I was working with long-term clients, some of which I had the pleasure of advising for over 20 years. Long cooperation built mutual trust and gave an in-depth understanding of the key elements of the client’s business. The legal challenges were solved in seamless cooperation between the representatives of the client and the dedicated team at D&I. I will surely be following the success of those companies also in the future. From a personal perspective, I already miss our special D&I team spirit. It works like glue and has built a strong community. D&I truly is a great place to work and it was not easy to say goodbye. Luckily, I do not have to leave it completely behind. Before I left, I made sure that I am on the invitation lists for practically all D&I events! And there are a lot of opportunities to stay in contact through the pro bono cooperation that continues between WWF and D&I. Q: Besides work-related text, what are you reading or planning to read next and why? At the moment, it is difficult for me to separate between work-related and other reading. There is so much I have to learn about the status of the planet, the research on the future and the ways to turn things around. I am presently reading a global forecast by Jorgen Randers called 2052. The book seeks to understand what the world is likely to look like in year 2052. I have not read far enough to tell you here what his conclusion is. If I manage to stay healthy and live long, I will be around to witness if he was right or wrong. I hope the world comes together and is able to make the necessary changes.
insight
Great Expectations
4 Dec 2017 In the high-stakes environment of leading law firms in Finland, customer experience is the new black. Differentiating, however, is challenging in a market where everyone is fiercely attempting to be the number one law firm delivering excellent service with the same Lego blocks: collaborating with the clients using the latest technology and focusing on talent while embracing the unprecedented change of 21st century. To make it in the face of intensified competition, one must speed up. Second, one must manage change. EEven the fastest changing law firms are not changing fast enough compared to their clients. Looking back, much has changed. When I graduated from law school in 2000, law firms in Finland couldn't care less about marketing or sales. It was an era of "eat what you kill" with transactional client relationships and word-of-mouth reputation was all that mattered. Active selling was considered almost shameful. I've lost count on how many times I've heard "a job well-done is the best kind of marketing" but it's definitely been more often than the times the clients were asked whether the job was indeed well-done. Client has always been the king, but nobody in this business, in the most noble of professions, has been talking about customer experience until recently. "The catalyst for this transformation is the client and her changing expectations" Today everyone is rushing as fast as they can to jump on the bandwagon of customer experience. The catalyst for this transformation is the client and her changing expectations of the modern law firm. In terms of winning a new client, having a good reputation for legal competence across a variety of practice areas is not an exceptionally good differentiator anymore. Client experience is. Aligning KPIs with those of the client lies at the heart of figuring out what really matters to in-house counsels who are measured by how well they serve their business in achieving its targets - and manage costs. Understanding what the in-house counsels value for money requires a good chat with them and, at the minimum, a change of the angle - especially in this business traditionally obsessed about Rolls-Royce standards, sometimes regardless of the type of work assigned. Often a big part of the law firm work happens behind the scenes, much like in a heart surgery where the patient is in full narcosis. Sure, the patient expects to have the best possible surgeon cutting her open with the best possible knives. What makes the difference is the entirety, including the pre-op and post-op parts of the service, the points of contact that the patient actually feels and experiences herself. In our own D&I Customer Satisfaction Survey in summer 2017, our clients were extremely happy with their client journey with us: how well we understood their business needs and collaborated with them on a daily basis. 98% of our clients who responded to the survey said they would recommend us. Without direct comparison to other market players, such praising results must obviously be taken with some grains of salt. We also take part in the currently ongoing Prospera Law Firm Review, the annual evaluation of the most respected Finnish law firms. Receiving feedback, especially critical, is very important for us in measuring our performance and in developing our customer experience further towards the best-in-class in Finland. Much as with adopting AI, sometimes firms believe they can leapfrog necessary prerequisites and just begin exceeding client expectations as of tomorrow. Often the missing piece is not asking the client. The most important thing is the firm culture and its link to the strategy, neither of which can be disconnected from the clients. At D&I we strongly believe in our team-player culture. It is a culture not fit for everyone, but loved by our own people, as reflected in the 2017 Great Place to Work® Finland survey where we were ranked as one of the TOP 10 workplaces in Finland. Our culture lies at the core of our customer promise and experience. Our Powerhouse operating model is an efficient customer-centric cross-silo way of working enabling innovative and holistic solutions matching our clients' business needs. Developing both our culture and our way of working is a must-win especially in terms of our future clients and partners, the millennials, who are already part of the junior work force. They are different in subtle but fundamental ways: less loyal, more informed, value social connection and purpose - and care more about the brand than the current clients. They may want to go climbing for months every year and may not see the value of showing up at the office at 8 am unless they are indeed needed at that ungodly hour, but they are as ambitious as we are, looking for personal and professional development and opportunities to do groundbreaking, meaningful work. In this respect, we couldn’t be happier that based on law students' votes, the Finnish Lawyers Association rated D&I the Best Law Student Employer of 2017 in Finland. With curiosity and enthusiasm we continue building a modern law firm of the future with an exceptional history of 118 years. Personally, I have great expectations for 2018 and urge you to stay tuned for our exciting news during the first quarter of 2018. Please, have a chat with your trusted D&I advisors and why not give me a call as well. I would love to hear about your great expectations. I'll trade them for a lunch.  

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