Culture

It’s a Team Game

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Amazing teamspirit.

TOP5 true things our people value @D&I

Inspiring goal.

TOP5 true things our people value @D&I

I get to use my expertise every day.

TOP5 true things our people value @D&I

Everyone is respected as who they really are.

TOP5 true things our people value @D&I

Exceptionally skilled colleagues.

TOP5 true things our people value @D&I

Culture is our defining differentiator, the one thing that truly sets us apart from any other law firm.

Our culture shines through in everything we do. It is the foundation for how we serve our clients and develop as a team and as individuals. Our culture is a live mixture of being extremely goal-oriented and completely humane at the same time.

We don’t believe in manuals or hierachies. Our systems and processes, traditions and rituals, even the way we communicate with each other, reflect our value-based Cultural Cornerstones.

Collaborating to build a better tomorrow is deeply embedded in our cultural dna. We want to believe we deliver value to the society through our active Pro Bono work. We believe it is our privilege to give back.

We create our culture together. You’re welcome to explore it yourself.

Start with Why

We have a clear purpose of delivering value to the society through our experience and expertise. We want to be the best law firm partner for demanding corporate clients and the best place to work for talented professionals. Today we are proud to be ranked in the TOP 5 of the best workplaces in Finland in the 2018 Great Place to Work® Finland survey.

Trust and respect are vital in building a healthy and happy workplace. We invest in fostering deep connections and creating shared experiences through making weekend trips to places such as Chamonix, Lago di Como and Kitzbühel with the whole team.

Big actions and small habits that maintain our laid-back office culture and humane social connections, such as our quite unusual firmwide WhatsApp-group, fuel idea generation and make us feel good about coming to the office every morning. We believe the way our people feel at work is directly linked in the way in which we engage with our clients to deliver service that is above and beyond what’s called for.

Thinking Ahead As a Powerhouse

We have been a leading Finnish law firm for quite some time for a good reason.

Since 1899 we have been engineering landmark transactions, solving major disputes and been there for our clients in times of significant changes, even revolutions. With our sterling reputation for high-end expertise and experience from the defining deals of the decades we have paved the way for an impressive list of clients.

Not everyone can rise to the challenges of the 21st century. With our client-centric Powerhouse method, we can. As a Powerhouse we take a global approach to a case and assemble a mix of specialists with experience from across practice groups and industries to form teams capable of delivering exceptional added value.

Much more than a philosophy to us, Powerhouse is our operative model for thinking ahead and supporting our clients’ objectives and growth. It is the practical embodiment of our Cultural Cornerstones.

Meet the Cornerstones

Passion

Winning teams are made of passion for reaching a common goal. We are passionate about what we do and passionate about letting it show.

For us, passion is ambition for excellence defined. It goes hand in hand with extraordinary client experiences. Insight and innovation, delivered with passion.

Respect

Respect is our key to attuning to our clients and colleagues – and to better collaboration. When we give feedback or challenge a colleague’s view, we do it in the same boat, striving to reach the best possible end-result as a team. We have a shared commitment to help each other grow.

We expect respect in every interaction, both internally and externally. It’s all about being present, showing appreciation through listening and being kind even when things don’t go as planned.

Respect, we believe, is the key to attune to our clients and their wants and needs. It’s not only our insight but also our clients’ insight that matters.

Team Before Individual

Teamwork is only common sense. For us the real thing is this: there’s no “I” in team. We work collaboratively together.

It’s very simple, really. We value teamplaying efforts, such as generous sharing of knowledge, more than individual scores. However, much like the most beautiful star constellations in the Northern sky, legendary winning teams are rarely made without star individuals.

We have enormous respect for our professionals as individuals with their distinctive skills and strengths. But while an individual may be hugely important for a battle, it does take a team to win a complex dispute.

Team Before Individual is embodied in our Powerhouse method. We blend talents for greater insight. Our organisational structure, processes and our compensation model foster collaboration and seek to eliminate any signs of internal competition. We compete against each other only in sports and poker.

When we put the team first, everything else falls into place.

Continuous Development

No-one gets to the top by resting on their heels.

Being agile and attuned to what is happening in the market is an imperative in building a modern law firm. While lawyers become increasingly paired with technology, human ability for creativity and strategic insight will be of greater value than ever before.

Continuous development of our uniquely human skills requires hard work. We see our Powerhouse method as one of our signature ways to foster the development of better lawyers and life-long learning.

Sending our people regularly to leadership trainings at Harvard fosters the development of better leadership. Sending our people regularly to Paphos seminars with philosopher Esa Saarinen fosters the development of better thinking leading to better life.

Being the best place to develop, both professionally and as an individual, is our promise that we take very seriously. We believe our people, our clients and the society deserve no less.

Common Goal

Our common goal is to make our clients succeed and thrive in the long-term.  

Latest Insights

insight
Legal developments at the end of the parliamentary term: Focus on effective legal monitoring
18 Oct 2018 As the current parliamentary term approaches its end, the workload of the Finnish Parliament keeps on increasing. There is a multitude of government proposals with high interest to our clients in parliamentary review at the moment, and it is unclear how the time limits relating to e.g. implementing EU directives will hold, and whether there is enough time to complete all relevant proceedings in due course. Transactions and legal solutions concerning our clients' business may be affected by the uncertainty, but we strive to keep our clients informed every step of the way. Everybody knows that it is essential for attorneys to keep up with constantly changing legislation. Insights on anticipated legislative reforms and amendments are something that our clients may specifically request from us. Naturally all our legal advice must be based on up-to-date legislation – taking into account any eventual changes in the near future. Our profession is a knowledge profession, and it is central for our lawyers to keep up with legal developments. In the course of this autumn, legislative processes and reforms have kept us busier than usual. This will continue until next spring, since the Finnish parliamentary elections will be held in mid-April 2019. All proposals submitted to the Parliament by the current Government must be approved during this electoral term, or else they will lapse. Unfortunately, it seems likely that a number of government proposals are destined to lapse, as the parliamentary committees' workload is enormous – and has been since last spring. There are currently several substantial – and also politically controversial – reforms under parliamentary review, such as the introduction of regional government, health and social services reform and government proposals for legislation on civil and military intelligence and on the oversight of intelligence gathering. Parliamentary review of these major reforms takes up a great deal of certain committees' time. The Social Affairs and Health Committee and the Constitutional Law Committee have been particularly burdened. Parliamentary review of approximately 170 government proposals is underway in mid-October 2018. According to the Government's plans, a further 120 government bills will be submitted to the Parliament during this electoral term, in the course of which they must also be approved. Small and technical amendments form a part of the aforementioned nearly 300 bills, but there is a multitude of government proposals with high interest to our corporate clients, such as the already delayed implementation of GDPR into Finnish legislation and all the amendments relating thereto. As the implementation of the EU's fifth money-laundering directive requires review by the Constitutional Law Committee, the aim to have it in force in the beginning of 2019 is also challenging. It is also worth to mention some other government proposals of significance, which have been recently submitted to the Parliament: proposal regarding amendments to energy taxation, which include stipulations on large-scale energy storages, and the reform of trademark legislation including amendments required in the EU trademark directive, which must be implemented already in January 2019. Even though legal information retrieval is a part of the basic skillset of every lawyer, the core duties of associates and attorneys working in a law firm do not include monitoring legislative processes. It is the expertise and focus on legal research that enables us legal knowledge management professionals to be of true value to our colleagues, who may then concentrate on their own legal expertise – and also on the business of our clients. Indeed, many of my colleagues have expressly shown their appreciation to our KM team's devotion on proactive follow-up of status and current contents of anticipated legislative amendments in the course of the past few months. It is fundamental for our clients to be aware of the forthcoming legislation in order to adjust their business accordingly, to ensure their continuing compliance and to stay on top of their game. Strategic legal advice is not only about the present, but also about the future. And although predicting the future seems to be harder than usual today, our continuous monitoring of legal developments and following-up on specific parliamentary proceedings in detail provides our lawyers the possibility to keep up with the anticipated amendments to legislation in their field of expertise. Effective legal knowledge management also makes it possible for both our lawyers and our clients to focus on what they do best: their core business.
insight
Earth Needs Good Lawyers
18 Jun 2018 As of January 2018, our much respected ex-Partner Raija-Leena Ojanen has been working as the legal advisor for WWF. At D&I, Raija was a true role model for her uncompromising dedication to the highest level of professional service. Q: What made you first want to work for WWF? The idea of working for an environmental organization slowly grew upon me. Through the pro bono work done at D&I for WWF, I started to receive regular dosages of information about the deterioration of the biodiversity, the overexploitation of natural resources and the increasing urgency to tackle climate change. The flow of information increased when I was appointed board member for WWF Finland.  Also, during those years, I had many interesting discussions with my daughter, who recently completed her masters in biology, about human genetics, biochemistry and how exposure to toxic chemicals affects us. Thirdly, client projects involving sustainability and compliance became more and more important parts of my work as head of Corporate advisory, Compliance and CSR. I remember starting to vaguely think about a future in globally oriented environmental work sometime around 2014/2015. The thoughts grew stronger last summer at Berkeley where I completed the first part of my two-summer LLM studies. At Berkeley I learned how big a role lawyers play, at least in America, in promoting environmentally conscious and sustainable public policies. I was greatly impressed by the organization Earthjustice that uses the slogan “Earth Needs a Good Lawyer”. Q: What are the most rewarding things about working at WWF? WWF works to build a future where there is good balance between nature and people. The work is done on a wide spectrum of activities ranging from building snowbanks to protect the newborn Saimaa ringed seal to hands-on building of fishways around dams in freshwater waterways to interaction with politicians and businesses about steps towards carbon-neutrality and further onto international talks at Arctic Council. Although I thought that I had a pretty good understanding ahead, I have been amazed during the first months as a new Panda (that’s what new recruits are called at WWF) at how much the group of about 60 people at WWF Finland can accomplish. The talent is in cooperation and the engaging organizations and people to work with WWF to reach important goals. It is very rewarding to be able to contribute my part for the saving of the world. Q: What legal issues or challenges have you got coming up on the horizon at WWF? The great challenge at WWF is making governments and businesses understand the urgency around climate change. Although the common goal under the Paris Agreement is to keep the global warming under 2°C compared to pre-industrial time, the transformation to carbon-neutrality is lagging seriously behind. It is apparent that the present policy approach that promotes voluntary efforts and produces legislation that impose transparency and reporting requirements to generate market pressure on reducing carbon footprints have proven to be insufficient. Making the changes happen soon enough seems to call for impact-oriented legislation. The parliaments in Finland, in EU and globally may need to move to passing binding obligation on government entities and businesses to assess whether their actions are in line with the two-degree target and if not, to make the necessary changes. The challenge is how to draft such legislation so that the rules are easy to understand, implement and monitor. Q: What do you miss from Dittmar & Indrenius? The best part of the work at D&I was working with long-term clients, some of which I had the pleasure of advising for over 20 years. Long cooperation built mutual trust and gave an in-depth understanding of the key elements of the client’s business. The legal challenges were solved in seamless cooperation between the representatives of the client and the dedicated team at D&I. I will surely be following the success of those companies also in the future. From a personal perspective, I already miss our special D&I team spirit. It works like glue and has built a strong community. D&I truly is a great place to work and it was not easy to say goodbye. Luckily, I do not have to leave it completely behind. Before I left, I made sure that I am on the invitation lists for practically all D&I events! And there are a lot of opportunities to stay in contact through the pro bono cooperation that continues between WWF and D&I. Q: Besides work-related text, what are you reading or planning to read next and why? At the moment, it is difficult for me to separate between work-related and other reading. There is so much I have to learn about the status of the planet, the research on the future and the ways to turn things around. I am presently reading a global forecast by Jorgen Randers called 2052. The book seeks to understand what the world is likely to look like in year 2052. I have not read far enough to tell you here what his conclusion is. If I manage to stay healthy and live long, I will be around to witness if he was right or wrong. I hope the world comes together and is able to make the necessary changes.

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