Jussi Lehtinen

Partner
Head of Dispute Powerhouse

Jussi Lehtinen

Partner
Head of Dispute Powerhouse

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Commercial, practical and straightforward approach.

Chambers Global & Europe 2017, Dispute Resolution

Recognized since 2014 in The Best Lawyers in Finland for work in: Arbitration and Mediation.

Best Lawyers

Prevention of disputes is the key. The most successful resolution of a dispute is preventing it from ever existing.

Jussi Lehtinen, Partner

Jussi Lehtinen has long-standing experience in litigation and arbitration cases, and acts on a broad range of corporate disputes, including cartel damages claims and contractual disputes.

Chambers Global & Europe 2018, Dispute Resolution

We have an exceptional track record of winning 9 out 10 disputes in the past 8 years.

Jussi Lehtinen, Partner
Dittmar & Indrenius > People > Jussi Lehtinen

Focus on demanding commercial arbitration and litigation proceedings.

Jussi Lehtinen is known for extensive experience in international arbitration proceedings under the rules of the major arbitration institutes as well as complex litigation proceedings including interim measures and cartel damages cases in general and specialized courts.

His wide-ranging caseload includes advising clients successfully in many high-profile cases. He also continuously acts as arbitrator in international and domestic arbitration proceedings.

Jussi Lehtinen is representative of Finland as a member in the Commission on Arbitration and ADR of the ICC International Chamber of Commerce.

Education

University of Helsinki (LL.M., 2003)

Accelerated Leadership Program (2017), Program on Negotiation (2009); Harvard University

Admitted: Finnish Bar Association

Languages

Finnish, English and Swedish

References

Latest Insights

insight
DR Meets Tech
22 Jun 2017 Change is inevitable. Society undergoes alterations every day and one cannot look at the world as it is today but the world as it will be. We are surrounded by technology in our daily life. This also applies to lawyers - will they be replaced by robots and would that actually be a bad thing? The above mentioned is one of the questions that was dealt with in D&I's Evening Classes (in Finnish Iltakoulu) where we had the honour to hear the visions of Riikka Koulu, a research fellow specialised in legal technology, legal automation and dispute resolution at the University of Helsinki. D&I has a special partnership with the Legal Tech Lab, an exciting project of the Faculty of Law, University of Helsinki, which has a mission to bring something new to the legal field: a new way of looking at legal services, new tools to facilitate participation and a forward-looking mindset.               Lawyers and the judicial system are often appearing to value stability and even seen to be unwilling to adapt to society's changes. Even today, the law sector in general is seen as conservative and traditional. However, it is undeniable that technology will change the role of lawyers. The question is how the lawyers can prepare themselves for the changes in order to be ready to engage the opportunities that technology offers. Gaining current information on legal technology is the starting point. At the moment, we at D&I are using an intelligent software for litigators and arbitration practitioners which makes writing large submissions with numerous exhibits easy. It allows us to create an ebrief, an interactive submission to courts and/or arbitral tribunals in pdf format with hyperlinks to the relevant exhibits. You can access the exhibits by clicking the hyperlinks in the footnotes. This process will open a new pdf window where the exhibit is displayed for your review. This is a spectacular example on how legal technology can serve lawyers and dispute resolution by making the writing and reading of submissions more efficient and pleasant. In addition, it involves the client in the production process. The client will be able to follow the lawyers' argumentation and be able to give input on the submissions before they are filed. For example, there is a tendency in international arbitration to depart from what can rightfully be called the "paper tsunami" to its digital equivalent: the e-arbitration. New terms have been coined for almost all steps of the arbitration proceedings: eBriefs, eDiscovery, eHearings, eArbitrators and eBundles. We believe that there is still a long way in litigation in Finland but some countries have a complete digital platform for court cases. Filings happen electronically, checking status of judgements can be done electronically, booking hearing dates can be done electronically etc. When everything shifts towards the digital sphere the intervention of AI becomes more relevant and prominent.     "Algorithms will become the new normal. AI taking care of the previously time-consuming routines, it is up to us lawyers to figure out how we will complete the big picture with the maximum value to our clients. Personally, I have always valued human interaction, listening and empathy, as key features in dispute resolution. To be honest, I welcome the robots automating everything else", says Partner Jussi Lehtinen. Key Insights Digitalization changes dispute resolution. Lawyers must be ready for changes and be able to understand their effect in practical dispute resolution. Project management is essential. In the future, lawyers must recognise when the human labour is needed. Utilise this opportunity to allocate human labour more efficiently. The price of anonymity and noninteraction can be high in dispute resolution. Prepare for disruption. Investing on the struggles of digitalization helps you to cope with the inevitable changes. Observe the downside of efficiency in dispute resolution –ensure that you do not prioritise efficiency at the expense of legal security.
insight
Dispute Academy – Preventing Future Disputes
13 Apr 2017 Today any of the following could land on your desk: a new supplier agreement, data processing agreement outsourcing the processing of your company's employee data or a submission to a court or an arbitral tribunal. There are few things in-house counsels dread more than disputes. Litigation at a court or an arbitral tribunal has a way of damaging relationships, harming reputations, and spending money, time, and talent. Everyone involved in international negotiations, contracts and corporate transactions knows that disputes are steadily increasing. However, they are also increasingly avoidable. "Prevention of disputes is the key. The most successful resolution of a dispute is preventing it from ever existing", says Jussi Lehtinen, Partner, Head of Dispute Resolution. Lehtinen feels strongly about preparing for the unexpected both in the contract negotiation phase and when litigation is inevitable. "Disputes need to be nipped in the bud to produce win-win solutions instead of leaving open terrain for bitter fights that can leave both sides damaged", Lehtinen says. Lehtinen is the father of the D&I Dispute Academy ("Riitelykoulu" in Finnish) where he shares insightful advice and best practices in tailored training sessions. "It would be short-sighted to think that managing the dispute at hand would be enough, even when victorious! Defending my clients' best interests over time requires me to help them in preventing their future disputes." In D&I Dispute Academy, as in his daily work, Lehtinen engages a multi-disciplinary D&I team to make sure that companies' legal and business teams are well prepared for preventing disputes. In the era of smart use of assets like business data, customer databases, innovations and other intangible property, holistic cross-practice considerations in contract drafting are extremely vital. One of the increasingly topical areas in which dispute resolution needs to be addressed is privacy and data protection clauses. Along with the significance of data as an asset increasing and the new EU General Data Protection Regulation entering into force, the number of privacy and data protection related disputes will undoubtedly increase. "Solid data protection knowledge is worth nothing in case a dispute due to a data breach or a liability issue arises. We need to look beyond apparent facts and consider potential future disputes already when drafting data privacy clauses", says Jukka Lång, Partner, Head of Data Protection, Marketing & Consumers. "As disputes have become increasingly more complex, parties have become increasingly more knowledgeable. We were suddenly discussing current dispute proceedings in Sweden and in the United States and comparing them with the Finnish system", says Jussi Lehtinen after the session of the Dispute Academy with in-house counsels and representatives of the management of a Finnish company with operations worldwide. "It would simply be bad advice not to consider dispute resolution when drafting data privacy clauses. Solid data protection knowledge is worth nothing in case a dispute arises due to a data breach or a liability issue" - Jukka Lång   For organizing a Dispute Academy training session for your team, please contact our Partners Jussi Lehtinen and Jukka Lång.

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